My Ssec Capstone Project Golding’s cynical views on human nature become further established once the boys exhibit power onto things much smaller than them

Golding’s cynical views on human nature become further established once the boys exhibit power onto things much smaller than them

Golding’s cynical views on human nature become further established once the boys exhibit power onto things much smaller than them, but can’t seem to carry out their actions because of their past life. As the novel progresses, Jack soon begins to have an obsession with hunting yet still fails he fails to kill the pig. Instead, he makes up excuses for it, although they all know the real reason, “the enormity of the knife…cutting into living flesh…the unbearable blood”, frightens Jack (1.31). He finds the gory aspect of the job Jack unsettling at first. In the society, Jack grew up in he didn’t have to kill for food because there was a job for that. In turn, Jack is not used to the idea of butchering for his own food. Similarly, Roger and Maurice begin to exhibit power over the little ones by kicking their sandcastles over. Golding acknowledges that in Maurice’s other life he would have “received chastisement for filling a younger eye with sand”, however, although there were no parents around “Maurice still felt an unease of wrongdoing” (4.61). Maurice realizes that what he has done to the little one is wrong even though he might like it. Furthering the claim that civilization held the boys back from it. Lastly, even Roger is held back by the “taboo of his old life” (4.62). When throwing rocks at Percival, another little one on the island he “threw it to miss” because “Roger’s arm was conditioned by a civilization that knew nothing of him” (4.62). Golding wants the readers to recognize Roger is holding back is because he has been conditioned to. Not because he realizes it is wrong. These boys want to exhort power on things weaker than them but cannot because of what they were taught is morally right from society.