My Ssec Capstone Project Fake news has become such a pervasive global problem that governments and organizations are now undertaking initiatives to mitigate its further proliferation

Fake news has become such a pervasive global problem that governments and organizations are now undertaking initiatives to mitigate its further proliferation

Fake news has become such a pervasive global problem that governments and organizations are now undertaking initiatives to mitigate its further proliferation. Russia’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, for instance, set up a website that lists and debunks publications that contain false information about the country. Conversely, the same is available in the website of the European Union’s External Action Service (EEAS), where content considered as misinformation campaigns are reviewed every week. Germany is shoring up its defences against misinformation campaigns ahead of an upcoming election by introducing a bill that seeks to curb the spread of fake news. It will also fine social networking sites as much as EUR 50 million for failing to comply with rules such as promptly removing fake content on their feeds. A similar initiative is also run by independent organizations in the United Kingdom (UK), where a team of fact-checkers monitor for and debunk fake, election-related news stories. Countries in Europe, Latin America, and Asia Pacific are reeling under the impact of fake news, which in turn is setting off a series of inquiries, policies, and other countermeasures.