My Ssec Capstone Project Description of Self When asked to describe myself I never know what to say

Description of Self When asked to describe myself I never know what to say

 Description of Self
When asked to describe myself I never know what to say, but I should know myself the best, right? My personality consists of different characteristic traits and habits which help to mould me into a decent human being. Certain aspects of my personality are good while there are other negative sides as well. However, the following are the better aspects of my personality; I am someone who is mature, candid and who has integrity. Every day I work to improve myself and my skills which is part of maturing and becoming better at what I do. I am well-mannered, using appropriate language, opening to criticisms, and conducting myself professionally. This I value because if everyone knew how to respect themselves and act respectfully to each others, we would easily get along with each other and thus there’d be more happiness and less conflict in our society, so we would make the world a better place. 
In addition, my self-motivation is empowering. Finding something that I enjoy and love to do and setting the final goal of achieving it. My main goal that I have set right now is to work towards finishing my degree. My motivation behind this is to be able to get a better job and to set a good example for boyswithin our society. With the right mind set, I can do anything that I put my mind to. My education is very important to me and will help get me further in life. No one can push you towards your dreams and goals; you have to have the will and determination to push yourself.

SWOT Analysis
A SWOT analysis is a high- level strategic planning model that helps organizations identify where they’re doing well and where they can improve both from an internal and external perspective. It is an acronym for “Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats.” It is common for organization to use the SWOT analysis to evaluate the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats for their businesses in the long term. In a similar manner, a SWOT analysis for self-assessment is essential to be carried out to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of one’s personality and to assess what opportunities one might have or what threats one might face in the long-term based on one’s strengths and weaknesses. By having awareness of these four aspects, it’s possible to use them for one’s advantage. If a person can identify and understand their strengths and opportunities, they will know where to tread with confidence and security. However, if one can realize the weaknesses and threats posed to them, it’s possible to focus on those areas so to improve upon weaknesses and overcome obstacles posed by threats.

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Strengths
I am an honest person. I tell people what I am thinking and how I feel; “the truth causes offence but it’s not a sin”. Being honest has helped me become closer to the people I care about most. I also think being honest with myselfhas helped me a great deal and I don’t allow negative thoughts control my actions. I am also patient, dedicated, determined, creative and respectful.My strengths are the key to my success and achievements.

Weaknesses
Weaknesses are unavoidable when dealing in a competitive environment. Weaknesses in an organization can be defined as “the drawbacks that hinder an organization in executing strategies in pursuit of its mission”. This definition stays true when dealing with individuals. Whatever can hold back someone from being competitive with others can be a weakness. Weaknesses are also any positive skills that your competitors may have but you don’t which helps them but may not necessarily harm you. My weaknesses are mainly my social skills and my over-commitment to my ways. I am quite open-minded, however when I follow something I believe to be best and gain momentum, I am unable to change direction and I become fixated on my goal.

My weaknesses hinder my abilities and are flaws in my personality, which could complicate my relationship with others. Arrogance along with being judgmentalis also a weakness for me. I am always doing my best and I expect others to do their best job, I can be quick to judge them when they don’t reach my expectations. Another important weakness of mine is that I have poor public speakingskills and stage fearness which I can never escape. When Imust speak in front of others, I always get very nervous no matter how prepared I am.

Opportunities
Opportunities are situations that present possibilities for exceeding existing goals. Opportunities can present themselves in many ways. Sometimes it can be by losing one resource you gain an opportunity to replace that resource with an even better resource. The other main most common type of opportunity is one that you yourself create. Trends in opportunities may be noticeable in some situations on a macro level, including education and social interaction with which anyone can relate. Some opportunities can also be created through the elimination of weaknesses. On my search for success in my career path there are many opportunities that I have available to me. Most of the opportunities are ones that I must create myself. My education for one is an opportunity that I am currently facing. It gives me the choice to either take advantage and do well, or not take advantage of the situation and miss out on the opportunity. I believe attending university is an opportunity for me to grow and learn in more ways that just by studying books. Students gain values from a college education as they learn to think outside the box and really test their mental limits. Students learn about respect, leadership, and communication from a college education.Other opportunities can be found in social opportunities to make connections, or generally any chance to gain benefit from a situation.

Threats
Threats can be viewed as anything that may stand in the way of accomplishing one’s goals, including factors that negatively affect your ability to compete with others. Threats come in many different forms and various levels of severity. Some of the most common threats that many people share include: opposing competition, internal struggles, and external obstacles in their field.The biggest treat I now face is financial constraint.
I can utilize my strengths to take advantage of opportunities
Education is an example of a competitive resource, knowledge is essential for success. My ability to advance and apply my education and knowledge in the field is a key to my personal success.

I believe that others view my strengths as my social skills and my ability to adapt to situations. I agree that I do have strength in my adaptability skills, however not the social part. I think of my social skills as more of a weakness, but I try to improvise by outgoing and positive, so that it may be a strength of mine. My strengths are the key to my success and achievements.

How threats can impact achievements of goals
The biggest threat I now face is financial constraint. When going about earning a degree, it takes financial support. If financial support is not there, then eventually the university will kick you.

How weakness can constraint or limit success
My weaknesses hinder my abilities and are flaws in my personality, which could complicate my relationship with others. Weakness can limit my success as in promotions or positions that may require presentations or public speaking. I normally underperform in academic settings because of anxieties about public speaking. It might also lower my success because if I have a great idea that could solve significant problems I won’t tell it to anyone because I might feel people may reject my ideas.
Key actions that are needed to achieve goals because of this analysis
Setting goal is easy but achieving them isn’t.That’s why setting SMART goals – Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and Timely – is the first step in making your goal a reality. Actions that will be taken to achieve my goals include:
Aligningmygoals withmy values-Setting goals that are meaningful to myself and be clear about the consequences of my outcome.

Sharing my goals with three to five key people- Finding supportive, positive people is key because I certainly don’t need anyone sabotaging your progress.

Minimizingpotential challenges-Create a complete, measurable, action plan that includes all the steps necessary to achieve my goal.
Establishing a support system-Finding outwho or what can provide me with encouragement, advice, healthy feedback or a willing ear.

Rewarding myself-Don’t wait until you achieve your goal, especially if it’s a long-term one. Reward yourself as you reach certain milestones.

Introduction
“Adjusting to the First Year of College: A Reflection on the Importance of Parental, Peer, and Institutional Support written by Ani Yazendjian, Michelle Toews, Katie Purswell, and Tessara Sevin, Texas University-San Marcos.” This article relates to adjusting to university life and getting to know more about who you are. Transition of first year students into the university can be difficult for some students as they are required to adapt into a new environment and learning styles that is different from what they have learned during their previous years in school. This report will provide a discussion about the issues affecting the transition of first year students into university life. There are different issues identified in this report and implications have also been provided in order to help students in their first year in university and also to help institutions to help their students adapt into university environments and learning styles.

Summary
Transition of first year students is defined as moving up from high school into tertiary levels, changes that all first year students entering university has to tackle on. Student transition is also describes as a category of transitional changes that is needed for students in entering academic life in universities, it is a process of moving from one community to another. The student’s relationship with tertiary education is not the same as the one they had in primary or secondary. University has a more complex and comprehensive environment than secondary schools, and many students give up their closeness with their families, friends, and home to cope within the university life for a few years. The students’ transition is all about the students dealing with the whole university life and not just simply the university as formal and more academic institutions. Students have to adjust into a new learning styles and new surroundings, also with the people in the institutions they will be interacting with during their university life. The students will be likely to deal with a whole form of challenges during their period of time studying in university: social, personal and intellectual. These transitions are sometimes spoken out in high schools or during the last year of high school to give students a picture of how university will be like for them when they enter it but the truth is that some can be true but many are not. While there are some challenging adjustments, there are also great success and experiences. Throughout the first year of college students also received parental support, peer support, institutional support and campus connection. Students described the different ways parents showed their support including the financial support. They described peers as providing both social and academic support. Supportive relationships with university personnel were highly appreciated, as well as how the campus connections promoted their adjustment.

Discussion
First year at universities are highly important in students life as they are now entering a different and a higher stage of education, it is significant yet it’s very challenging. Making the transition to academic life at any university can be one of the most difficult and challenging experiences faced by first year students. Transition to the university life have also been one of the reasons why some students withdraws from their study, as they have experienced hard times or lack of self confidence to tackle the new stage of education. In order for students to achieve this stage of their life many institutions have introduced programs to help students and encourage them on how to be more focused in their studies and how to overcome the issues discussed in this report.

Application/ Implication
Throughout the focus groups it was founded that students noted the importance of parental support in adjusting to college. Therefore, parents can be encouraged to maintain this relationship with their children by providing instrumental support, such as accompanying them to university orientations, and emotional support, such as emailing, calling, and sending care packages. In addition, universities can offer programs and publications that provide strategies for parents to support the developing independence of their children. These services should address how parents can deal with their own emotions regarding the changing relationship with their children and also facilitate their children’s transition to adulthood. Findings also indicated that while peers served as a source of support when adjusting to college, they could distract students from their academics as well. Thus, universities may want to develop opportunities for students to establish peer networks, while at the same time encouraging academics. For example, students could be admitted into cohorts that take their core courses together. This would allow them to meet new people, as well as engage in activities that may increase their academic adjustment. Specifically, the students in our study indicated that taking classes together allowed them to form study groups, share class notes, and encouraged them to study. Professors could also facilitate peer interactions by requiring group work, assigning paired exams, allowing class time for group activities, and/or encouraging students to form study groups.

Personal Assessment
Making a transition as a first year student into academic life at a tertiary institution can be one of the most challenging experiences. It is challenging not only in terms of academic purposes but also as it is the stage in my life where I am experiencing emotional, financial and social problems. As a student of tertiary institution, I have been making some huge adjustments such as: new learning and studying styles, assessments styles and writing practices. Despite it all, transition to university life can be challenging, yet it is still a very awarding experience.

Bibliography
Books
Kinicki ; Williams, (2009) The Journal of Child Psychology
Johnson, (1997); McGrath ; Braunstein, (1997); Pascarella ; Terenzini, (1991)
Cites
My Weakness. (2017, Mar 27). Retrieved from https://studymoose.com/my-weakness-essayStrategic management Report Management. (2013, June 3). Retrieved September 26, 2018, from https://www.essaytown.com/subjects/paper/strategic-management-report/9568292SWOT Analysis Self-Assessment Project (2011, February 21). Retrieved September 26, 2018, from https://www.essaytown.com/subjects/paper/swot-analysis-self-assessment-project/41013Essays, UK, (November 2013). Personal SWOT Analysis – Oneself/ Myself. Retrieved from https://www.ukessays.com/essays/business-strategy/personal-swot-analysis.php?vref=1University of Technology
College of Business and Management
School of Business Administration
Academic Year 2018-19
Semester: 1
Module: Business Etiquette
Date of Submission: October 1, 2018
Name: Shackecha Williamson
ID#: 1800475
Lecturer: Dr Jennifer CadogonTutorial Day/Time: Mondays 8 a.m.- 10 a.m.

Adjusting to the First Year of College: A Reflection on the Importance of Parental, Peer, and Institutional Support Ani Yazedjian Ph.D.1 , Michelle Toews Ph.D., Katie Purswell, and Tessara Sevin Texas State University-San Marcos.

Introduction
High attrition rates at universities across the country are a cause for concern. Research has found personal factors, such as a lack of adjustment to college, are more predictive of attrition than academic factors. Furthermore, college adjustment, or the lack thereof, is related to non-cognitive factors. These findings point to the importance of understanding the role of social and institutional support during the first year of college. Yet, there is limited research that examines, from the students’ perspectives, how these factors support their transition to college. Moreover, the majority of research has been quantitative in nature. Such methods may not have allowed us to fully understand the influence of these factors on students’ adjustment. Therefore, we will be giving voice to students’ experiences as we explore how parents, peers, and university personnel serve as sources of support as they adjust to their new environment.

Literature Review
Research on the relationship between parental support and college adjustment is limited, and the research that has been done has been inconsistent. Specifically, some researchers found that parental support was not a significant predictor of adjust me, while others found that support was positively related to college adjustment. Regardless of the emotional support provided by parents, if they lack college experience, it is possible that they may be unable to provide instrumental support while their children adjust to a new context. In support of this assumption, found that college students whose parents had some college experience reported higher levels of adjustment than students whose parents had none. Peers can also serve as a source of support for students in college. found that peer support appeared to be more critical to college adjustment than parental support. Peer support is particularly salient for first-generation college students. Although few studies have examined the relationship between institutional support and college adjustment, numerous studies have found that institutional factors predict retention (Johnson, 1997; McGrath & Braunstein, 1997; Pascarella & Terenzini, 1991). Specifically, compared to students who dropped out, students who remained at the university reported more frequent and positive interactions with faculty and other university personnel (Johnson, 1997; Pascarella & Terenzini, 1991). Similarly, it was founded that students’ perceptions of the university and faculty support predicted overall college adjustment. In sum, few studies have qualitatively examined how factors such as parental, peer, and institutional support jointly influence students’ adjustment during the first year of college. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the subjective meanings and unique perspectives of college students as they successfully adjusted to life at the university. We were primarily interested in how students navigated their new environment and what factors facilitated their adjustment to college. Specifically, we were interested in how parents, peers, and university personnel served as sources of support as students adjusted to their new environment. Methodology.
This study was part of a larger study examining first-year students at a 4-year public university in central Texas. Participants initially completed an online survey during the second-semester of their first year. In order to examine the experiences of students who were academically successful, we selected students who had a GPA of 2.0 or higher (the university’s standard of academic success) for our qualitative sample. A total of 22 students in their second year of college participated in six focus groups. The sample was comprised of 72.7% females and 27.3% males, ranging in age from 19 to 20. The sample was 40.9% Hispanic, 36.4% White, and 22.7% Black. Overall, the students were academically successful, with a mean GPA of 3.17 (SD=.60). To address the principle of homogeneity, the focus groups were split according to ethnic group membership and parents’ education. We used a semi structured interview protocol that examined how parents, peers, and university personnel supported students as they adjusted to college. Given the exploratory nature of the study, we used grounded theory approach to analyze how these factors affected adjustment.
Findings
First, students discussed the financial support they received from their parents. Students also described the emotional support they received from their parents. Another way parents expressed their support was through letters, packages, and phone calls. Students appeared to appreciate the time family members put into preparing the packages because they demonstrated how much they cared. Another reason the letters and packages were more valued was because students often perceived parents’ phone calls as a source of stress. In addition, all but one of the first-generation college students described how they felt their parents did not understand the complexity of college life. While first-generation students felt supported by their parents in their decision to go to college, they did not feel they could seek advice from them. This idea is supported by who found that students whose parents had a college education were at an advantage because their parents were more knowledgeable about college. As a result of their parents’ inexperience with college, these students tended to seek advice from peers. Peer Support Similar to previous research, the students in the focus groups expressed the importance of peer support in their adjustment to college.
Peer support
Specifically, students described peers as providing both social and academic support. In fact, students often cited their friends as their favorite aspect of the university.

Furthermore, students described the value of having friends who shared a similar academic mindset. A shared mindset encouraged students to engage in activities that might increase the likelihood of academic adjustment. Although students often discussed relationships with peers as a source of academic support, they also described how peers could distract them from behaviors that supported academic adjustment. While social relationships with peers distracted from academics at times, peers were still providing the social support that students noted as being important to their connections to the university. Therefore, it appears that students must be able to find a balance between the academic and social aspects of their peer relationships.

Institutional Support
Another factor cited by the students was the importance of institutional support. This included supportive relationships with university personnel as well as the atmosphere of the campus. There was a perception among the students that the faculty and staff at this university were friendlier and more student-centered than those at other schools. In addition, students reported one major draw of the school was that it had the benefits of a large university such as resources and sports, but it was still small enough that they felt valued as individuals and not just a number. Almost every respondent reported that the location of the school, in between two larger cities, allowed them to enjoy the benefits of “city attractions” while also enjoying the benefits of a small town atmosphere. While this is specific to this institution and may not be generalizable to other schools, the frequency with which this theme was mentioned points to the importance of unique campus characteristics in facilitating college adjustment.
Campus Connections
Students also discussed how orientation programs, classes, dorms, campus events, and student organizations promoted their connections to the campus and facilitated their adjustment. Students identified the orientation session and the seminar for first-year students as resources the university provided to support them as they adjusted to college. Yet, they described the initial orientation as overwhelming because they received too much information and noted that the content in the first-year seminar was often not perceived as relevant to their lives. Students also cited other campus institutions that they knew were available to them, yet were underutilized. Often, students stated a vague familiarity with the available resources, but also reported that they did not take the initiative to follow-up. For example, the Hispanic and African American students were asked if they were aware of the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs. They reported that they were aware of the Office, but few used their services. In contrast, all students discussed their knowledge of the Career Services Center. By hearing about the Center in multiple contexts and on multiple occasions, students demonstrated an awareness of the services offered by the Center and indicated a greater likelihood to utilize their resources. While students were aware of the potential resources around them, they were less likely to use them unless they were exposed to them in multiple contexts. Students also mentioned that meeting others in the dorms, in classes, and through campus organizations made the university context seem less overwhelming, less anonymous, and gave them a greater sense of affiliation with the institution.

Adjustment Challenges
Even though the students in our sample experienced a moderate degree of academic success, many still discussed how the transition to college was difficult. For example, some students reported a general sense of homesickness following their arrival on campus. However, all the respondents eventually developed strategies to cope with their feelings, which may in part explain their successful adjustment to college. Another factor that made the college transition more difficult was a lack of connections once in the new environment. Many of the students who reported a lack of social connections were those who did not come to campus with others from their high schools. However, while the presence of high school peers facilitated the transition for some students, for others, their presence was a constraining factor, one that prevented them from meeting new people. For example, one student who came to campus with a boyfriend reported that she spent much of her time with him and was unable to spend time meeting new people. A compelling sentiment that was underscored by some of the students was the idea that a large part of successfully transitioning to college is the responsibility of the student. Some students felt that although the university provided a number of resources, it was often up to the student to pursue those resources. For example, orientation provided information regarding campus organizations, but students reported very little follow-up regarding those resources. It is possible that placing such responsibility on students may disadvantage those who did not have the inclination to follow-up or the knowledge they needed to take the initiative to do so.

Strengths and Limitations
This study makes a distinctive contribution to the literature because it utilized qualitative methods to illustrate, from the students’ point-of-view, how different factors facilitate the successful transition to college. This study also provided more detailed information about how the institution can facilitate adjustment. Despite these strengths, the results must be interpreted with some caution because of several methodological limitations. First, although qualitative studies are not necessarily concerned with large sample sizes, one limitation of our study was the small number of participants. Yet, since we heard many of the same themes throughout the focus groups, we believe this commonality in themes supports the credibility of our findings. Another limitation was the small sample of first-generation students. However, our findings suggest that there are some differences in how support is experienced for first-generation and continuing-generation college students. Future work should more fully examine those potential differences because previous research utilizing standardized measures may not have detected these subtle differences between groups. One final limitation is that our study only captures the views of students who are considered academically successful. It is beyond the scope of this study to determine if parents, peers, and the institution differentially influence the adjustment process of students who are on academic probation. Therefore, future research should look at what factors specifically relate to students’ inability to adjust without assuming that it is the absence of the factors involved in successful adjustment.

Implications for Practice
Throughout the focus groups we found that students noted the importance of parental support in adjusting to college. Therefore, parents can be encouraged to maintain this relationship with their children by providing instrumental support, such as accompanying them to university orientations, and emotional support, such as emailing, calling, and sending care packages. In addition, universities can offer programs and publications that provide strategies for parents to support the developing independence of their children. These services should address how parents can deal with their own emotions regarding the changing relationship with their children and also facilitate their children’s transition to adulthood. Our findings also indicated that while peers served as a source of support when adjusting to college, they could distract students from their academics as well. Thus, universities may want to develop opportunities for students to establish peer networks, while at the same time encouraging academics. For example, students could be admitted into cohorts that take their core courses together. This would allow them to meet new people, as well as engage in activities that may increase their academic adjustment. Specifically, the students in our study indicated that taking classes together allowed them to form study groups, share class notes, and encouraged them to study. Professors could also facilitate peer interactions by requiring group work, assigning paired exams, allowing class time for group activities, and/or encouraging students to form study groups. Similar to previous research, we also found that students who interacted with university personnel felt more connected to the institution, a factor that may have assisted in the adjustment process. Therefore, universities could provide opportunities for students to become involved in mentoring programs where they are paired with faculty and other university personnel. Such opportunities may direct students to more efficiently and purposefully employ the resources already at their disposal. Furthermore, these mentoring relationships may be particularly useful to first-generation college students who reported that they could not seek advice from their parents. While many universities have orientation programs and first-year seminar courses, the students in our study reported they were relatively ineffective. Based on these findings, universities may want to consider establishing a standard curriculum for seminars for first-year students that incorporates on-going orientation. For example, students could research resources on campus and report their findings to the class, guest speakers could be brought in from various organizations across campus to discuss the services they provide, and professors could require students to complete library search assignments or papers on plagiarism. Universities could also ask students what they think would be important to learn and incorporate that information into the curriculum. Previous research has found that students who have difficulties adjusting to college are more likely to withdraw thus, it is important to examine, from the students’ perspective, what factors facilitate adjustment. Based on students’ narratives, we concluded that support from parents, peers, and the institution facilitated adjustment to the first year of college. However, we also found that these support systems, at times, hindered their adjustment. Understanding how the same factors can both help and hinder students as they adjust to college is useful to university personnel in developing, implementing, and evaluating activities and services aimed at facilitating students’ transition to their new environment.

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